When Bad Names happen to Good Bands

Funny blog post today by Bob Boilen of All Song Considered about Bad Band Names…a perpetual source of amusement for musicheads. What got Bob going was a band called The Dodos, whowere DOA until he heard them play at South by Southwest in Austin.

Of course, poorly-named bands have been around since Bill Haley launched his Comets. And by pure coincidence, I had just happened to run across another post in the Web-o-sphere the day before called The 25 Most Ridiculous Names in Rock History -broken down into “Stealth Ridiculous” – (Porno for Pyros, the Alan Parsons Project) “Lazily Ridiculous” (Of Montreal, W.A.S.P.), “Just Plain Ridiculous” (The The, Mr. Mister, The Mr. T Experience), and finally, “The Painfully Ridiculous,” (Archers of Loaf, Hootie and the Blowfish, and Numero Uno, !!! (or Chk-Chk-Chk, in tribute to the 80s cult classic movie The Gods Must Be Crazy)

Common to both lists: bands inadvertantly named by members of the Monty Python troupe, including my personal favorite, Toad The Wet Sprocket. Both a Brit and American band took the name after a hilarious Eric Idle skit on (“Rock Notes”) on Monty Python’s Contractual Obligation Album.

And Death Cab for Cutie was coined by Pythoner Neil Innes, during his days with the gonzo Bonzo Dog Band. Don’t remember Neil? He’s the smart-aleck minstrel chronicling the adventures of chicken-livered “Brave Sir Robin” on Monty Python and the Holy Grail….

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PS – Click here for more than you ever wanted to know about Band name origins…

Academy Award Followup: Jian Wang = John Wayne

Jian Wang - From Mao to MozartAfter Sunday’s posting about my non-viewing of the Academy Awards (and judging by the low-ratings scorecard, I had plenty of company!), once I got to the concert I realized/remembered three more factoids that made the whole music – movies link with Jian Wang even more even more apropos:

*It could be argured that Jian owes his entire career to the silver screen. It was a film, after all, that introduced the West to Jain Wang — as a ten-year old budding cellist who appears while the credits roll at the tail-end of the 1981 Isaac Stern documentary From Mao to Mozart. Continuing the previous theme, an Oscar winner, natch. (You can see the YouTube Video of the last 10 mins or so of the movie either by clicking on Jian’s picture above or here). And what happened after that? This from an interview Wang gave to Strings magazine:

Sau-Wing Lam, a music enthusiast who had left China in 1948 and built up a large and prosperous business in the U.S., saw From Mao to Mozart and was fascinated by the young cellist. Through the director of the Shanghai Conservatory, an old schoolmate, he made inquiries about the boy and learned of his exceptional promise. Lam then wrote to China’s Minister of Culture, proposing to help Wang further his studies in America……

*So when Jian Wang (pronounced “zhan WHONG”) eventually made to America, his Juilliard classmates gave him an American nickname: “John Wayne.”

*And as Wang racks up glowing reviews for his interpretations of the Bach Cello Suites, (and I considered it a real treat to hear him play these life in a room before an audience of about 100 people), he credits…(wait for it)……a terrific French film about the life of Baroque composer Marin Marais and his teacher Saint Colombe for changing his approach to playing Baroque music in general, and Bach in particular.

In the beginning I tried to play the [cello] suites like songs, to make them pretty. But by my mid-20s, they became about more than just being beautiful – also about what we hope to be in this world but can’t. At least for me, it was a view into another spiritual world. After that, I started liking the way I played them better, and then I noticed that other people did too.

I would say one of the triggers was the movie Tous les Matins du Monde. The scene that touched me greatly was when Saint Colombe sits down and begins playing, thinking about his wife who had just died. The simplicity of the music, the organic feeling of it, brought tears to my eyes. From then on, I listened to a lot of Baroque music. I find it very much like Chinese poetry. You know, some concertos are like novels, with fascinating, fantastic stories. You get an entirely different feeling when you read a 20-character poem in Chinese. In those four lines, with five characters per line, you have a mini-universe, so dense and yet so simple. It makes you feel that the world is much more logical.

Click here to read the entire interview with Jian Wang, who’s playing the Bach cello suites tonight at the new Harman Center in Downtown DC.

And here for more on the great soundtrack recorded by Jordi Savall that sparked the worldwide Marin Marais craze. Okay, that’s a stretch. But I do remember the haunting Bells of St. Genevieve got a fair amount of airplay after the move came out in ’92….

Soundtrack - Tous les matins du monde

J.S. & The Oscars: That Old Bach Magic

Jian WangUnlike last year, I won’t be in front of the boobtube tonight for Oscar night; instead I’ll be doing one of my Concert Previews at a Washington Performing Arts Society – sponsored “house concert” featuring a terrific young Chinese cellist named Jian Wang, who’s in town to play various of the six solo cello suites by J.S. Bach. The Bach suites are both one of the absolute monuments for anybody who’s ever tried to pull a bow across a cello (or doublebass, or viola, or trombone, or, or, or…) but for my money they’re one of the Great. Alltime Works. By Anybody. Ever.
Howcum? Well, here I’m going to tip my hat to the shade of the late, great cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, who in his own words decided to “pluck up the courage” to record the six solo suites rather [shockingly] late in his career:

“Bach has no shallow or transitory emotions, no momentary anger, no bad words or fleeting embraces – his emotions are as vast a scale as Shakespeare’s, yet common to all people on earth, from the most northerly to the most southerly races. We all weep when we suffer, we all know tears of joy. It is these fundamental emotions that Bach transmits in his suites.”

In fact, I think there is something kind of miraculous about this music — music written almost 300 years ago that at times is the essence of simplicity, particularly the broken-chord arpeggios that lead off the First Suite – as simple, Rostropovich said, as breathing: “The phrase generates energy (inhales) untill it reaches a certain point when it is released (exhales).” If that sounds too technical, it doesn’t when you hear it.

And out of this solo music Bach spins music more compelling than a symphony of a thousand, or a full-blown band with the volume turned up to 11.So all that got me to thinking about the juxtaposition of Bach and the movies, which after all are all about playing with our transitory emotions, fleeting embraces, and so on to create some usually mawkish, but very occasionally something profound and deeply moving.

Which then got me to thinking about one of my all-time favorite movies, Truly Madly Deeply, made in 1990, and starring a very un-Severus Snapeish Alan Rickman and the terrific English actress Juliet Stevenson, and directed by Anthony (”English Patient”) Minghella. The Ghost-like plot (also from the same year!) revolved around the relationship among dead-cellist Rickman, his wife-in-another-life Stevenson, and her new beau….and the music of Bach is so powerful it’s almost another character in the film.Bach’s soundtrack abilities have not been lost on other directors, it seems.

Turns that T,M,D is but one of 207 feature films that have been documented to use Bach’s music, with a surprisingly large percentage of them devoted to none other than the solo cello suites. And it seems that if you put a Bach solo-cello piece into your film, your chances of being nominated – or winning! some Oscar hardware go up exponentially. For certain film directors (hello Ingmar Bergman!), you might even call it “that old Bach magic.” On the other hand, a few directors have some explaining to do….Here’s

The Official List of Bach Cello Suites Used in Movie Soundtracks:

Another Woman – Gena Rowlands, Mia Farrow, Dir. Woody Allen, 1988

Cello Suite No. 6

Antonia’s Line (movie)Antonia’s Line – Dir. Marleen Gorris (Netherlands) – 1996 1 Oscar: (Best Foreign Film)

Cello Suite No. 1

autumn sonataAutumn Sonata – Dir. Ingmar Bergman, 1978. 2 Oscar nominations (Best Actress – Ingrid Bergman; Original Screenplay: Ingmar Bergman)

Cello Suite No. 4 [Sarabande]

The CompanyNeve Campbell, dir. Robert Altman, 2003

Cello Suite No.1 [Minuet]

Cries and Whispers movieCries and Whispers –Dir. Ingmar Bergman, 1972. 5 Oscar nominations, (Best Picture, Best Director, Adapted Screenplay, Costume Design), 1 win (Best Cinematography – Sven Nykivst)

Cello Suite No. 5

Hilary & JackieHilary & JackieEmily Watson, Rachel Griffiths, 1998. 2 Oscar nominations (Best Actress – Emily Watson; Supporting Actress – Rachel Griffiths)

Cello Suite No. 1 [Prélude & Gigue]

Cello Suite No. 3 [Prélude]

Cello Suite No. 6 [Gavotte]

The Hunger Catherine Deneuve, David Bowie, Susan Sarandon 1983

Cello Suite No.1 [Prélude]

J´Embrasse Pas – Emmanuelle Béart, 1991 (France)

Cello Suite No.1 [Prélude]

Grey Knight, a/k/a The Killing Box Corbin Bernsen, Billy Bob Thornton, Martin Sheen (1993)

Cello Suite No.1

Lost and Found – David Spade, 1999

Cello Suite No.1 [Prélude]

Master and CommanderMaster and Commander: The Far Side of the WorldRussell Crowe, dir. Peter Weir, 2003. 10 Oscar nominations (Best Picture, Director, Art Direction, Costume Design, Editing, Sound Mixing, Visual Effects, Makeup); 2 wins (Cinematography & Sound Editing)

Cello Suite No.1 [Prélude]

Music of the HeartMusic of the HeartMeryl Streep, West Craven (!), dir. 1999. 2 Oscar nominations: Best Actress (Streep); Original Song

Cello Suite No.1

The Pianist (movie)The PianistAdrian Brody, dir. Roman Polanski, 2002. 7 Oscar nominations (Best Picture, Cinematography, Editing, Costume Design); 3 wins (Best Director, Actor, Adapted Screenplay)

Cello Suite No. 1

The Prince and Me – Julia Stiles, dir. Martha Coolidge, 2004.

Cello Suite No.1 [Prélude]

A Simple Twist of Fate – Steve Martin, Gabriel Byrne, 1999.

Cello Suite No.1 [Prélude]

The Sleepy Time GalJacqueline Bisset, 2001

Cello Suite No. 5

Small Time Crooks – Woody Allen, actor/dir, 2000

Cello Suite No. 2 [Sarabande]

Through A Glass Darkly (movie)Through a Glass Darkly – Ingmar Bergman, 1961. 2 Oscar Nominations (Original Screenplay); 1 win (Best Foreign Film)

Cello Suite No. 2 [Sarabande]

You Can Count On MeYou Can Count on Me – Mark Ruffalo, Matthew Broderick, Kenneth Lonergran, writer/director, 2000. 2 Oscar nominations (Best Actress-Laura Linney; Best Writer – Kenneth Lonergan)

Cello Suite No. 1

Honorable Mention:

Yo-Yo Ma: Inspired by BachAtom Egoyan, five others (1997) – 2 Emmy AwardsNot a movie per se (although it was screened in other countries and at film festivals) about a decade ago Yo-Yo Ma made a series of six short films devoted to exploring the Bach solo cello suites from a different artist perspective, including, film, dance, and architecture. The best known (and probably most successful) of the six is Suite No. 4, Sarabande, directed by Atom Egoyan, which “tells the story of a failed relationship that culminates in the couple attending a Yo-Yo Ma performance of the piece at Roy Thomson Hall in Toronto.”

Fanny & AlexanderFanny and Alexander – Ingmar Bergman, 1982. 6 Oscar nominations, including Best Director & Screenplay; 4 wins (Foreign Film, Cinematogrpahy, Art Direction, Costume Design)

Vast amounts of ink have been spilled about Bergman’s masterful use of music in the movies, particularly of Bach and Mozart. But in this film you won’t hear any of Bach cello suites; instead, Bergman makes the unorthodox choice of using the three solo cello suites written by English composer Benjamin Britten! (In fact, that’s Britten’s music you hear at the very opening of the film.)

Which brings us back to the beginning of this post, for Britten was also “inspired by Bach,” as it were….he wrote and dedicated the pieces to his close friend Mstislav Rostropovich after hearing the cellist play……..you guessed it, one of Bach’s solo suites.

By the way, a tip o’ the hat to Naxos, both for their work in promoting and recording soundtracks by dedicated film composers, as well as for putting together a nice new database of classical music at the movies.

There’s also a nice site called Classics of the Silver Screen.

Finally, if I ever get asked to choose a piece of Bach’s cello music for the silver screen, I think I’d pick this.

Down The Rabbit Hole


We interrupt this regularly-scheduled blog to marvel for a moment about a DVD that Mrs. RoeDeo (a/k/a Dr. Wizard)
has been after me to watch for about six months now: What the Bleep Do We Know?

She was right (as usual) – I found it utterly absorbing. 48 hours later, lots of it is still rattling around in my brain. Part of what took me so long to see it in the first place was that the synopsis was non-sensical to me. Now that I’ve seen it, it’s equally hard for me to describe. But any movie that inspire the following tag lines (courtesy of amazon.com) has got to have something going for it: Quantum Mechanics | Science | Quantum Physics | Semi Documentary | Spirituality | Physics | Biochemistry | Adultery | Bathtub Scene | Catholic Church | Channeling | Dance

Turns out there are even What the Bleep study groups that have sprouted up around the globe. There are a bunch in Texas, one in Mississippi, and lots elsewhere, but none so far here in the land called Almost Heaven. Curious and Curiouser.

Oscar Night


All right, everyone’s got an opinion about the movies, so today’s lead is a few observations from last night’s Oscar roundup:

*I work in radio, not TV, but I was profoundly impressed with the originality and creativity of the production. There were more new (and mostly good!) ideas on the show that I’ve seen in years of Oscar-watching. The first twenty minutes were as good as live television gets – the opening Errol Morris “Nominees” film – the (John C. Reilly) – (“a comedian at the Oscars is the saddest, bitterest alcoholic clown.”) – the cheerfully and elegantly navigated by Ellen DeGeneres. Sadly, (and predictably) it ran out of gas and went on for way too long, but far better than usual.

>Who are the Hollywood Sound Effects Choir? Are they for real? 40 voices “singing” sound effects to a classic-film backdrop. Brilliant. Sadly, the Oscar and ABC sites don’t tell us a thing about them…

>So, if three out of five songs from Dreamgirls are nominated for Best Original Song and they lose out to a fashionable-if-pedestrian (“I Need to Wake Up”) effort from Melissa Etheridge, what does that say about a movie that’s supposed to be based on the phenomenon of a label called “Hitsville USA?” (Oh, and there’s a reason the “official” movie URL is “dreamgirlsmovie”)

>Watching her perform the song live with the eco-bromides flashing in the background was Radio on the TV – if the radio station is the new DC-based station The Globe (subject of a previous rant)

>Nice to see Gustavo Santaolallaget the prize for Best Original Score for Babel. Classy acceptance speech, too. I’m one of millions who missed this film and intend to fix that. (Santaolalla won for Brokeback Mountain last year). Check out my old NPR colleague Andy Trudeau’s piece on Santaolla’s screen-music techniques with Weekend Edition Sunday host Liane Hansen. Andy knows more about film music than any man alive, I’ll wager, and he’s NPR’s “go-to guy” on the subject. His entire series on Oscar music nominees is worth a listen,
as is the piece he did on last night’s Honorary Oscar award winner Ennio Morricone.

>Classiest acceptance speech of the night: Ari Sandel, for the the Live Action Short West Bank Story. The clip they showed – The Sharks and the Jets transformed into feuding falafel stands – looked brilliant. So where you see something like this in Anytown USA? Answer: Off the website, I guess.

>Classy speech II: Former USC opera singer and King of Scotland Best Actor winner Forest Whitaker. Hard to believe he made his movie debut with Fast Times at Ridgemont High. I also discovered that last year Whitaker literally lent his voice to a cause called Before the Music Dies, a documentary shown at SXSW and other places featuring a cast of – get this – Bonnie Raitt, Branford Marsalis,Dave Matthews Band Elvis Costello, Eric ClaptonErykah BaduLes Paul – and Widespread Panic, just to name a few. I wonder if we’ll ever hear Whitaker sing again? That is, somewhere other than on YouTube, which features him in an impromptu performance on a Milan TV station